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As we leave the summer behind, students and teachers will be starting the 2011-2012 school year. In a third world country like Haiti, children face many preventable health risks. We need your help to diminish these risks and you can do so by sponsoring a school child for the year in Haiti. For a mere $10, you can help save a young life by clicking here.

Project Medishare for Haiti developed a School Based Health Program to give every child attending primary schools in the Medishare catchment area in the Central Plateau a physical exam and healthcare during the school year, including vaccinations, an assessment for anemia/malnutrition, a vision and hearing screening, a dental check, de-worming and referral to clinics for follow-up. Your generous donation can help guarantee the continuation of this important program for children of the Central Plateau. Project Medishare sees approximately 12,000 children per year in this program alone.

Project Medishare responded quickly to the Cholera outbreak last year using different prevention methods. This was possible because of Medishare’s long history of community support and education. Meetings were held at the schools to train staff and students on the signs and symptoms of Cholera. Liquid bleach, water treatment tablets, disinfectant and oral rehydration salts were distributed to all of the schools during the first quarter of the school year. Many of the school children participated in Cholera awareness campaigns at their local churches on Sundays. We are doubling our efforts to identify funding in order to provide access to clean water to our populations, most specifically to the school children.

As you prepare your own family and friends for the start of a productive school year, please consider a donation to support this program to keep Haitian students safe and healthy. Just $10 sponsors one child, and with a $100 donation, you can sponsor 10 kids to receive healthcare this year. We appreciate your generosity to ensure that children in Haiti have access to the healthcare they so desperately need.

Thank you for your contribution.

Sincerely,

Dr. Barth A. Green

School Children in Haiti's Central Plateau at a Project Medishare assembly

School Children in Haiti's Central Plateau at a Project Medishare assembly

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Darline is a 14-year-old Haitian girl who attends Eben Ezer School in Pareidon, Lahoye. She participated in cholera outreach that was held at her school through Project Medishare and later at her church.

In March of 2011 her neighbor became ill and was vomiting. The neighbors’ family assumed this was just indigestion. Because of the recent training she had received, Darline suspected that her neighbor had cholera. She ran to the Project Medishare Lahoye clinic to notify the nurse in charge. By the end of the day, when the nurse visited the neighbor’s house, two more members of the family were down with the same symptoms and were immediately transported to the clinic. Within weeks, a major epidemic developed in the area and Project Medishare opened a Cholera Treatment Unit in order to respond to the emergency. This was accomplished thanks to a grant from the United Way of Miami-Dade.

Today, Darline is very involved in outreach at her church and now assists at a fixed cholera supply distribution point that has been set up at her house. She hopes to pursue her studies and aspires to become a nurse to be able to take care of her community.

Project Medishare clinic in Lahoye, Haiti

If you would like to help us in purchasing lifesaving supplies that will help treat as well as prevent the spread of this outbreak, please click here to make an online donation today.

Thank you once again for all you do to help us continue provide healthcare in Haiti!

In July 2011, Jimmy arrived at Hospital Bernard Mevs Project Medishare exhibiting symptoms of a rare condition called myasthenia gravis. Myasthenia gravis is a neuromuscular disorder, which involves the muscles and the nerves that control them. Our hospital staff and medical volunteers treated Jimmy. The volunteer group that week was from Eastern Health, an organization that went to Haiti with Project Medishare all the way from Newfoundland, Canada.

It was clear that Jimmy would not be able to leave our Intensive Care Unit due to needing intravenous medication every two and a half hours to control his condition. In the United States, myasthenia gravis is treated with a daily medication and patients lead very normal lives. In a third world country like Haiti, quality of life is much different with myasthenia gravis. In order to leave the hospital, Jimmy would need oral pyridostigmine, an expensive medication that is not available in Haiti. Without this medication, he would need to be an inpatient indefinitely. As a 21-year-old first-year medical student, this was a debilitating and heartbreaking realization.

Only two short weeks after the Canadian volunteer group returned home from Haiti, a one-year supply of oral pyridostigmine arrived at the Project Medishare warehouse in Miami, FL. The medication was delivered to Port-au-Prince that Saturday morning by our weekly volunteer staff.

The Intensive Care Unit coordinator at Hospital Bernard Mevs Project Medishare, Judith, gave Jimmy the medication and explained to him that with the medicine he would be able to return home and lead a normal life. Jimmy had been ill since April and was near death just a few short weeks ago. When he was asked what the first thing he wanted to do when he left the hospital, Jimmy stated, “return to medical school.”  None of the hospital staff had known he was a medical student until that moment.

Jimmy wanted us to extend his sincere thanks to the Canadian group who, by sending this medication, gave him the gift of continuing to live his life and allowing a (future) fellow doctor graduate in a country much in need of medical personnel.

Jimmy with his mother at Hospital Bernard Mevs Project Medishare

The hospital staff sends their best wishes to Jimmy and his family. And again, thank you to the Eastern Health Canadian team for sending us pyridostigmine.

The Miami Dolphins organization has been incredibly charitable and supportive of Project Medishare. This week at practice was no exception. As you may recall from a previous post the Dolphins helped to reconnect three young boys, displaced by the 2010 Haitian earthquake, with their family members in Haiti. These boys were all MedEvac’ed out of Haiti with serious injuries following the earthquake and received numerous surgeries at Miami Children’s Hospital. 10-year-old Peterson suffered a serious head injury and a severed ear and required 16 surgeries, Junior, a 17-year-old high school student sustained a serious leg injury, and 10-year-old Belix also had a head injury and multiple surgeries.

On Tuesday, August 9th, 2011, Aventura Worldwide Transportation Services picked up the boys and their family members in Miami and drove out to the Miami Dolphins official practice facility in Davie, FL. There they were greeted by coach Sparano’s wife, Jeanette, Ilona Wolpin, Senior Director of Community Relations and Michelle Beck of Community Relations. They were brought to the VIP section of the stands and enjoyed a fun afternoon of watching the Dolphins practice while eating lunch, playing and laughing with each other. The boys were all given Dolphins merchandise including a banner. When the practice was over, the boys were brought down to a special area where they were able to meet many of the players as well as Head Coach Tony Sparano and received many autographs on their banners!

Miami Dolphin Reggie Bush with Junior, Belix, Kristian and Jeanette Sparano. Photo credit: Kelly Gavin

It was an extraordinary day that these Dolfans will surely never forget!

Miami Dolphin Jake Long with Belix, Junior, Peterson & Wadner. Photo credit: Kelly Gavin

On a side note, it was very heartwarming to see some of our special friends, Kristian and Xavier Jack, reunite with Jeanette Sparano and Benny Sapp. They all became very close last year after a tragic event occurred in the Jack family. Xavier and Kristians brother Quentin and their sister Ashleigh moved to Georgia but all of the children formed lasting relationships with Jeanette and Benny.

Head Coach Tony Sparano, Xavier Jack, Miami Dolphin Benny Sapp, Jiovanni & Kristian Jack (front). Photo credit: Kelly Gavin

Special thanks to the Miami Dolphins, especially Ilona Wolpin, Senior Director of Community Relations, Coach and Jeanette Sparano, Michelle Beck, Community Relations and Eric Knowles, Senior Director of Government Affairs. We would also like to express our sincere gratitude to Aventura Worldwide Transportation Services and Scott Tinkler for providing transportation for the day.

DENVER, Aug. 1, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Team Zaryen, Port-au-Prince’s amputee soccer team, will tour the United States this fall, running soccer clinics for wounded members of the U.S. military and focusing attention on the great strides being made by those with disabilities in Haiti.

The tour will be co-sponsored by the Knights of Columbus and Project Medishare, who co-founded “Healing Haiti’s Children” – a program that has made prosthetics available to every child who lost a limb in last year’s earthquake in Port-au-Prince. All of the players on Team Zaryen have received prosthetics courtesy of this program. The earthquake in Haiti last year left thousands of amputees in its wake – many of them children and young adults.

The team and its U.S. tour are some of many positive results to have come from the “Healing Haiti’s Children” program. The program makes a multi-year course of prosthetic care and physical therapy available to every child who lost a limb as a result of the earthquake. Included in the rehabilitation is the “Return to Sport” program where Team Zaryen coaches children and youth in this fast-paced sport so that they too can enjoy the fun and excitement of sport and learn to lead normal lives.

The Knights of Columbus have committed more than $1 million to the “Healing Haiti’s Children” program through Project Medishare, which runs the premier hospital for amputees in Haiti.

“The Knights of Columbus is honored to be able to be able to help transform the lives of children and young people in Haiti and to bring healing and hope to some of the neediest people in our hemisphere,” said Supreme Knight Carl Anderson. “We are very happy to have the members of Team Zaryen, who have overcome so much, with us at our convention.”

“Following the earthquake, there was a tremendous outpouring of support from the people of the United States, much of it coordinated by America’s armed forces,” said Dr. Bob Gailey, director of rehabilitation services for Project Medishare. “Team Zaryen is now looking to return the favor by running clinics for wounded American service members this fall in the United States, and we are honored to be working together with the Knights of Columbus to assist these young people in Haiti and to be providing these clinics for the U.S. military.”

A key reason for forming the soccer team was to change attitudes in Haiti and to help remove the negative stigma associated with being an amputee in Haitian society. The members of Team Zaryen believe their example will prove to the youth of their nation that despite any handicap, there are no limits to what an individual, a team, or a nation can achieve.

Project Medishare for Haiti was founded in 1994 by Drs. Barth Green and Arthur Fournier when they assembled the first team of faculty from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Nursing to assess the health status of Haitians and explore ways of rebuilding their healthcare infrastructure in a long term and meaningful way.

The Knights of Columbus is the world’s largest lay Catholic organization, with more than 1.8 million members around the world. Last year they donated more than $154 million to charity and donated more than 70 million volunteer hours to charitable causes.

Representatives from Team Zaryen with Jason Miller & Dr. Bob Gailey, Director of Rehabilitation Services for Project Medishare, at the Knights of Columbus 129th annual Supreme Convention in Denver, CO.

Special thanks to Perry Ellis for outfitting Team Zaryen for the US tour!

This article can be found on the PRNewswire by clicking here!

Project Medishare for Haiti would like to thank the pediatric team from Nemours for joining us at Hospital Bernard Mevs. Nemours is a Children’s Health System. Their Mission is “to provide leadership, institutions and services to restore and improve the health of children through care and programs not readily available, with one high standard of quality and distinction regardless of the recipient’s financial status.” The team that came to Hospital Bernard Mevs traveled from the Nemours hospital in Delaware. They brought down a team of six nurses, two doctors and a Respiratory Therapist. Some members of the team were actually at the Project Medishare field hospital last year. They plan on sending two more teams down to Bernard Mevs this year. The team was made up of Beth Moore, RN, Joey Muller, RN, Gail Gallagher, RN, Debra Miller, RN, Sandy Glenn-Vernon, RN, Becky Schorn, RN, Amy Renwick, MD, Edward Cullen, MD, Suzanne Moon, RT.

Suzanne Moon, RT spent a lot of time teaching Ms. Blanchard, one of the Haitian nurses training in pediatric critical care, how to use the ventilator and the different types of ventilation used in pediatrics. The rest of the team was working side by side with the Haitian nurses training them in neonatal and pediatric critical care. The team has also gathered a lot of donated supplies that they have brought to Haiti and will continue to bring more on their next two trips.

Nemours founder, Alfred I. duPont firmly believed that “it is the duty of everyone in the world to do what is within his power to alleviate human suffering.” Mr. duPont’s words and his legacy of compassion have lived on for more than 70 years through the care and services provided to children and families at Nemours. The care and services have now been shared with our staff and in turn our patients in Haiti.

Suzanne Moon, RT from Nemours training Haitian nurse, Ms. Blanchard on a pediatric ventilator.

Project Medishare for Haiti would like to extend a huge thank you to Network Computing Architects, Inc., a Bellevue, Washington based firm. Network Computing Architects, Inc. recently donated several pieces of high-grade network electronics to Project Medishare. These electronics are the backbone of the CT scanner imaging network located at the Hospital Bernard Mevs Project Medishare in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The donated goods are valued between $20,000-$25,000. Registered Technologist Dean Lee and Dr. Bill Crenshaw met with Thomas Gobeille, President and CEO of Network Computing Architects, Inc. and Lee Craft. Thomas and Lee kindly asked what else they could do to help Project Medishare and without hesitation, donated the electronics.

Thomas Gobeille is responsible for management and direction of Network Computing Architects, Inc.  His ultimate focus is on the technical sales process and providing the tools and support to drive consultative lead business solutions. Mr. Gobeille was nominated for “Entrepreneur of the Year” for the State of Washington and sits on several CEO and Operating Officer roundtables.

We are extremely grateful to Network Computing Architects, Inc., Thomas Gobeille and Lee Craft for their generous donation.

Network electronics

The old network electronics

Registered Technologist Dean Lee, Dr. Marlon Bitar, Dr. Jerry Bitar, Dr. Barth A. Green & Dr. Bill Crenshaw in front of the new donated network electronics

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