Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for August, 2009

By Jennifer Browning

According to About.com Guide to Caribbean travel, Robert Curley things are looking up for Haiti in terms of travel.

The United Nations has stated that the crime rate is down. In addition to the overall crime, murder rates have decreased and the rate of kidnappings in Haiti has fallen off dramatically this year.

Haiti police are claiming that even Cite Soleil, the country’s largest slum, has been relatively peaceful due to dismantling gangs and arresting many of their leaders.

Read more

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

By Jennifer Browning

The International Fund for Agricultural Development and the Food and Agriculture Organization have combined efforts in a $10.2 million effort to distribute and multiply quality seeds in Haiti in order to significantly increased food production, making cheaper food accessible and boosting farmers’ incomes, according to Sylvie Wabbes, a senior emergency operations officer with the Rome-based Food and Agriculture Organization.

Wabbes told United Press International that this program is the first major U.N. effort to forestall hunger in the Haitian farmer communities and had already recorded success.

Project Medishare has also been working toward boosting agriculture in the Central Plateau.

In May 2008, Project Medishare began experimenting with 20 of the 220 Earth Boxes which were donated to Project Medishare by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO). In partnership with Project Medishare and The Global Institute at the University of Miami, the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at the University of Florida (IFAS) has been providing technical assistance for the  agricultural program. The program is an effort to begin an alternative growing program for the vulnerable (elders, sick, handicapped), children and adolescents. Thanks to Project Medishare’s Agronomist, Ronal Bien-aimé and IFAS’s Florence Sergile the Earth Boxes experiment proved to be a success and has expanded from the trial garden to the clinic in Marmont so visitors and patients can see the possibilities of alternative gardening, and the link between nutrition and good health.
(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Jennifer Browning

The new Ambassador of the United States in Haiti, Ambassador Kenneth H. Merten, arrived Port-au-Prince yesterday where he presented his letters of accreditation to Haitian President  Rene Préval.

Ambassador Merten reiterated the United State’s support to Haiti.

“I know that these are still difficult times and Haiti has many, many needs. I have no illusions,” Ambassador Merten told South Florida Caribbean News. “Yet I also feel optimistic, because Haiti now has many of the elements to move into a more peaceful, democratic and prosperous future.”

Merten also said he is looking forward to work as a friend and a partner of Haiti.

Read more here.

Read Full Post »

By Jennifer Browning

Photographer Jeff Antebi traveled to Haiti this past April to photograph the Haitian Senatorial elections.

In his article on The Huffington Post, Antebi explains his own initial fears and hesitations about his first visit to the country. After listing the horrifying statistics that make up Haiti, Antebi goes into the side of the story most don’t see unless they have been there. He tells readers that Haiti is far from the abyss as it is portrayed on the news.

Read Jeff Antebi’s article here.

See his photos from the Haitian Senatorial elections here.

Read Full Post »

By Jennifer Browning

The Haitian Group for the Study of Kaposi’s Sarcoma and Opportunistic Infections (GHESKIO) was featured in the August 20 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine where follow-up data was released regarding the detailed outcomes of GHESKIO patients after five years of receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART).

Prior to using ART in Haiti (2003), 90 percent of AIDS patients died in less than a year and all were dead at the end of two years. The article reports finding that patients followed after receiving ART had a 90 percent survival rate after one year and a 79 percent survival rate after five years. The findings outcomes are comparable to the most advance hospitals in the United States.

GHESKIO physicians began there battle with AIDS in Haiti in the late 1970s.

“GEHSKIO physicians would not have dreamed that this day would have been possible less than thirty years from the days when the disease was barely defined, let alone thought survivable,” Projects Administrator Sandra Camille, Projects Administrator at GHESKIO said. “We are grateful to all partners, colleagues, and supporters and continuing our work together towards the realization of an HIV/AIDS free Haiti.”

Click here to read the 5-Year Survival of Patients with AIDS Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Haiti. (August 20, 2009)

Click here to read the Antiretroviral Therapy in a Thousand Patients with AIDS in Haiti. (December 1, 2005)

Read Full Post »

By Jennifer Browning

Eyebrows raise with shock and surprise when I tell people I have just returned from Haiti. Isn’t it dangerous? Aren’t you afraid? Aren’t they kidnapping people? What about the violence? Isn’t it sad?

Hand-carved canoes on Lac Peligre. Photo by Jennifer Browning.

Hand-carved canoes on Lac Peligre. Photo by Jennifer Browning.

I sigh, smile and begin a hopeful dialogue about how I have fallen in love with this small vibrant, beautiful island country in the Caribbean. I blurt out about how despite its turmoil, Haiti and her people remain strong, resilient and Haiti’s drum beats on so that her dance can continue. The Haiti I long for when I am back in the States is not one of complete turmoil and despair, but one of beautiful mountains, vibrant music, spicy Creole cooking, and the people…..the people who show so much passion and spirit. I think of the smiles I receive on the roads I walk down. The simple, modest Bonjou from one person or the hug and Sak passe! from another.

Women dance to Haitian roots music (Racine).Photo by Jennifer Browning.

Women dance to Haitian roots music (Racine).Photo by Jennifer Browning.

One night during my first visit, I chose to sleep outside on the roof of the guest house where we were staying in Thomonde. I am not sure if it was the unpolluted sky embellished with stars above me, or the intoxicating, rhythmic drum beat in the far off distance, but I think that is when Haiti began her courtship with me. Each day of each visit, the dance has continued. Whether its watching women dance and sing to racine music, sitting on a front porch with a cup of strong black Haitian coffee, or watching children play soccer with a ball made from a rice sack, a rag and string….Haiti makes me never want to be too far away from her for too long.

Amy Wilentz confesses her own love affair with Haiti in her Conde Naste Traveler piece Love and Haiti. Read about her affair, and you may feel that you too need to jump in and take the plunge toward this special place (she also has travel suggestions!).

Read Full Post »

By Jennifer Browning

The United States Agency for International Development [USAID] is partnering with Fondation Sogebank, a philanthropic institution of Haiti’s largest commercial bank, to establish the Haitian Diaspora Marketplace.

A two-year pilot program, the Haitian Diaspora Marketplace is designed to encourage Haitians living abroad to contribute to Haiti’s economic development through direct investment in productive business activities.  The program encourages the creation and growth of small businesses in key sectors, such agriculture, tourism, and information and communication technology.

Diaspora entrepreneurs will also have access to grant funding through the Haitian Diaspora Marketplace and will have the opportunity to receive technical assistance to the businesses. The implementation phase of the grants will include USAID contributions ranging from $50,000 to $100,000 with a 2 to 1 minimum cost-sharing requirement.

Read full story here.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: